Research Posts

Server Message Block Research The Rumble scan engine received big updates this month for the HTTP, RDP, and SMB protocols. The SMB work was focused on improving protocol support for SMB1, SMB2, and SMB3, including better desktop/server detection, and reporting of available compression methods in SMB3 (to support CVE-2020-0796 investigations). One thing that stood out during this work was the SMB2 SessionID field. Similar to a web application session, this field is allocated by the server and used to identify an authenticated session.
Earlier this week, Gerry Gosselin and Eric Rioux of VertitechIT were investigating a strange result in the Rumble asset inventory; After scanning an external subnet with Rumble, they noticed that the main internet router was responding to SNMP probes on its normal address and HSRP address. The router in question had a strong SNMP v2 community as well an IP ACL on the SNMP service. Rumble still reported the router vendor, manufacturing date, and MAC address via SNMP, all unauthenticated and from the internet.
Refocusing on Research Our mission is to empower our customers with amazing network visibility through applied research. With the v1.1.0 release behind us, we are excited to renew our focus on research. Last month, our founder and CEO HD Moore presented at Texas Cyber Summit and LASCON X on modern network discovery techniques. A similar presentation can be found on our Youtube channel. This post highlights three techniques from this presentation and how Rumble uses them to improve network visibility.

Our last post covered some of the ways that Rumble gathers information from DNS services. While working on the tracer implementation, we identified a trick that other folks might find it useful. It turns out that most DNS resolvers do not filter the address ranges they will contact when handling a request, allowing for remote subnet “ping scans” with a little work. This technique isn’t foolproof, and is probably not new, but it may have interesting security implications.

DNS is an amazing protocol. After starting life as a simple mechanism for name resolution, it is now used to enforce TLS rules, prevent email impersonation, authorize users, protect endpoints, enable service discovery, and much more. DNS services run across a range of devices and provide quite a bit of information about the environment, given the right queries. This post describes the techniques used by the Beta 2 version of Rumble Network Discovery to identify DNS services.